Sherborne (01935 816228):

Weekday: 8:30am to 6:00pm | Saturday: Closed Sunday: Closed

Yeovil (01935 474415):

Weekday: 8:30am to 6:00pm (open until 8pm Tuesday & Thursday) | Saturday: 9am to 2pm | Sunday: 9am to 12pm

Introducing an Eye Clinic to the Sherborne Country Fair

Dogs are said to be man’s best friend; apparently it’s all down to those puppy dog eyes! Last year scientists in Japan found that gazing into your pet’s eyes caused a spike in the same hormone that is responsible for the bond between a parent and child. So don’t worry you’re not being soppy, its science!

Dogs are said to be man’s best friend; apparently it’s all down to those puppy dog eyes! Last year scientists in Japan found that gazing into your pet’s eyes caused a spike in the same hormone that is responsible for the bond between a parent and child. So don’t worry you’re not being soppy, its science!

Our eyes are precious and irreplaceable but unfortunately they are susceptible to a huge number of diseases, many of which are hereditary. It is for this reason the British Veterinary Association (BVA) set up a screening programme for hereditary eye disease in dogs. It is run in conjunction with the Kennel Club (KC) and the International Sheep Dog Society (ISDS).

The main purpose of the scheme is to ensure there is no evidence of hereditary eye diseases in dogs used for breeding. By screening these dogs hopefully we can prevent these diseases being passed on to future generations of puppies. There are 12 hereditary conditions covered by the scheme in over 50 breeds, many of which are untreatable so prevention really is the only cure. In general, the best age for eye testing is when a dog has reached one year old and thereafter on an annual basis. However, in some breeds, it is necessary to test them as young puppies (usually between six and twelve weeks of age) to detect diseases such as Collie Eye Anomaly.

Although the scheme records whether hereditary eye conditions are present or not, it also identifies any other abnormalities present in the eye or surrounding structures such as the eyelids, so it is a very comprehensive examination of your dog’s entire eye.

This is a really worthwhile scheme and once again we are the official Veterinary Surgeons for the Sherborne Country Fair on the 30th May. We have therefore arranged for Nick Burden, a BVA appointed eye panelist, to attend with us. He will be conducting eye examinations under the BVA Eye Scheme for the day. Appointments can be made in advance by contacting one of our surgeries.

An eye examination lasts approximately 10 minutes and costs £35 per dog. You will need to arrive 20mins before your appointment to allow time for eye drops to be administered. Breeds which are predisposed to Glaucoma (a potentially blinding raised pressure inside the eye) are recommended to undergo a further test as part of their certification; this costs an additional £44 and lasts an extra 10 minutes. £3 from each test will be donated to the Country Fair Charity fund. All dogs must be microchipped to be screened and KC registered dogs must present their KC certificates to be added to the scheme and certified.

If you are considering breeding from your dog this is not only an essential part of pre-breeding screening but part of your responsibility to ensure the health of future generations. Even if your dog is past breeding age, eye examinations still play an important role in screening for inherited eye diseases presenting later in life and as a means of assessing eye and general health. Places are limited so please don’t hesitate to contact one of our surgeries for further information or to book a place.

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